Wages...

  • Thread starter Anonymous Remailer (austria)
  • Start date

A

Anonymous Remailer (austria)

Now that the age of people borrowing on credit cars over the last ten
years, instead of asking for pay rises, has passed, will their be an
inevitable increase in inflation if wage demands are successful?
 
Ad

Advertisements

?

\(!\)

Anonymous Remailer (austria) said:
Now that the age of people borrowing on credit cars over the last ten
years, instead of asking for pay rises, has passed, will their be an
inevitable increase in inflation if wage demands are successful?
companies should have been giving their employees a cost of living raise I
thought that was the rule of thumb.

wage demands ????
 
N

Nebulous

Anonymous Remailer (austria) said:
Now that the age of people borrowing on credit cars over the last ten
years, instead of asking for pay rises, has passed, will their be an
inevitable increase in inflation if wage demands are successful?
No - Wage demands are unlikely to be granted in a depresssion. People will
need to learn how to live on the money they make.

Neb
 
D

Derek Geldard

companies should have been giving their employees a cost of living raise I
thought that was the rule of thumb.
Not really. If a firm is in a declining industry it often can't pay
cost of living increases. Then if workers want more money they have
to leave to get it and lose all their employment rights related to
years of service.

That's If they can.
wage demands ????
derek
 
D

Derek Geldard

Now that the age of people borrowing on credit cars over the last ten
years, instead of asking for pay rises, has passed,
I wonder about the need for expensive urgent repairs to houses, cars
etc.that might have been paid on a credit card previously.

What if you need a new roof, new drains etc ? Houses bought on credit
weren't being built all that well 15 or so years ago.
will their be an
inevitable increase in inflation if wage demands are successful?
There's an old financial maxim concerning blood and stones.

Derek.
 
A

Anonymous Remailer (austria)

in message


No - Wage demands are unlikely to be granted in a depresssion. People
will need to learn how to live on the money they make.

Neb

What if people don't earn enough to even pay for the basics, ie:
mortgage, water, basic food, heating, lighting...?
 
Y

Yellow

Anonymous Remailer (austria) said:
What if people don't earn enough to even pay for the basics, ie:
mortgage, water, basic food, heating, lighting...?
A mortgage is not compulsory and people can rent and/or share and that will
help with the other items on your list also.
 
A

Anonymous Remailer (austria)

in message


companies should have been giving their employees a cost of living
raise I thought that was the rule of thumb.

wage demands ????
If you have low paid employees who no longer have access to credit to 'keep
themselves afloat', then they will look to their employers for wage
increases...
 
D

Derek Geldard

If you have low paid employees who no longer have access to credit to 'keep
themselves afloat', then they will look to their employers for wage
increases...
They can "Look" all they like. If the business is not generating
enough money to pay them any more they will "Look" in vain.

Derek
 
A

Anonymous Remailer (austria)

Yellow said:
in message


A mortgage is not compulsory and people can rent and/or share and that
will help with the other items on your list also.
Where I currently live, it's (currently) more cost to rent than to to
have a mortgage...
 
D

Derek Geldard

Where I currently live, it's (currently) more cost to rent than to to
have a mortgage...
You can go on housing benefit immediately if you are renting.

Derek
 
?

\(!\)

Derek Geldard said:
They can "Look" all they like. If the business is not generating
enough money to pay them any more they will "Look" in vain.

Derek
and they leave thus forcing the company further down hill................
 
D

Derek Geldard

and they leave thus forcing the company further down hill................
Yes, the best ones (with prospects) go first.

You only get one life, and that's too short to spend fart-arsing about
in a company that's on it's last legs.

Derek
 
B

BobC

Yes, the best ones (with prospects) go first.
Very true.
I worked at a place which no longer exists, which decided to
"restructure" and had a few rounds of redundancies, with very generous
terms. The people climbing over each other to volunteer were the best
ones who knew they could walk into another job.
By the end, all that was left was the dross who knew they couldn't get
another job because they were useless at the one they'd got.
So they finished up with just a load of rubbish and went pop!
You only get one life, and that's too short to spend fart-arsing about
in a company that's on it's last legs.
That's why I was one of the first ones out!
BobC
 
A

Alex

At 14:10:45 on 18/11/2008, Anonymous Remailer (austria) delighted
uk.finance by announcing:
ten >> years, instead of asking for pay rises, has passed, will their
be an >> inevitable increase in inflation if wage demands are
successful?


What if people don't earn enough to even pay for the basics, ie:
mortgage, water, basic food, heating, lighting...?
Then they will have a difficult time. What if the company doesn't earn
enough to even pay for the basics?
 
M

Mark

You can go on housing benefit immediately if you are renting.
Only if you are on a *very* low income.

--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) Owing to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
(")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking most articles
posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
everyone you will need use a different method of posting.
See http://improve-usenet.org
 
M

Mark

Yes, the best ones (with prospects) go first.
Only if there are viable alternatives.
You only get one life, and that's too short to spend fart-arsing about
in a company that's on it's last legs.
A company does not have to be on it's last legs to decline to give
decent pay rises.

--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) Owing to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
(")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking most articles
posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
everyone you will need use a different method of posting.
See http://improve-usenet.org
 
D

Derek Geldard

Only if you are on a *very* low income.
Like if your salary is the only income you've got and the job goes
breasts uppermost ?

A circumstance scarecely without precedence nowadays.

Derek
 
N

Nebulous

Anonymous Remailer (austria) said:
What if people don't earn enough to even pay for the basics, ie:
mortgage, water, basic food, heating, lighting...?
Many things that people regard as basics are not basics at all - they are
lifestyle choices.

I have been in the situation where we voluntarily took a huge drop in
income, and it is amazing what you can do without.

Most people are protected in that there is a minimum wage and top-ups in
terms of tax credits etc for low paid people, particularly those with
families.

What you are describing is someone whose lifestyle had run ahead of his/her
income by borrowing, which was always going to be a short-term fix. Many
people have developed a £45k lifestyle on £25k money. For many of those
people a wage rise is not the answer - it's getting rid of the debt. Whether
that means throwing themselves on the tender mercies of their creditors,
selling any property which still has equity in it, or declaring bankruptcy
doesn't really matter (though it may to the person!)

Neb
 
Ad

Advertisements

R

Ronald Raygun

Nebulous said:
Many things that people regard as basics are not basics at all - they are
lifestyle choices.

I have been in the situation where we voluntarily took a huge drop in
income, and it is amazing what you can do without.
Indeed.

Most people are protected in that there is a minimum wage and top-ups in
terms of tax credits etc for low paid people, particularly those with
families.
There isn't really any such thing as a minimum wage, there is only a
prescribed minimum *hourly rate of pay* for those hours for which you
are paid. There is no prescribed minimum number of hours per week
anyone is obliged to employ you for, and therefore your (weekly) wage
can be as low as circumstances require - the employer simply cuts
your hours.

Then there is the additional possibility that you might be expected
to "volunteer" to work more hours than you are paid for, if that's
what it takes to safeguard what's left of your job. This means that
if your official rate of pay is already near or at the NMW, and if the
number of voluntary hours is at all significant, then your effective
hourly pay could, quite legally, be below NMW.

I don't understand on what grounds employees should expect an easy
ride. After all, many self-employed (particularly those who also
employ people) are effectively below NMW, if not even at times on
a negative wage.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

Wages 8
UK Barista's wages - are they direct wages? 0
draws/wages 2
Wages in COGS 2
UK Wage percentage 1
Foreign Wages 7
A living wage.. 70
Wage Deductions 2

Top