Working at a JC to help people.


J

John Scovell

I notice that Mike say he goes to work for money, Fair enough but I
would have thought that to work in a JC you should have some interest
in wanting to help people. I once sent of for details of working in a
JC and the reply back went on about helping people.
So, if someone at an interview says he/she is applying to help people
would that go in their favour or would they be seen as some dogooder
and not wanted.
 
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M

Mike

John Scovell said:
I notice that Mike say he goes to work for money, Fair enough but I
would have thought that to work in a JC you should have some interest
in wanting to help people. I once sent of for details of working in a
JC and the reply back went on about helping people.
So, if someone at an interview says he/she is applying to help people
would that go in their favour or would they be seen as some dogooder
and not wanted.
Probably not, but the the do-gooder will be ground out of them by
unremmitting boredom of processing, frustration (system/IT/management
/gov.), being moaned at by customers about circumstances well beyond your
control and the ingratitude/downright nastiness of a few customers.
Most people apply for thejob because they see it as a long term career, some
because they want to help but many apply because its fills the time in
before they find something better. The turnover of staff is very high but
that first year is the killer, over the last 18 mths-2 years I would
estimate in my office about 1/3 new recruits have left before the end of
their first year. This is prob a little over the average but not much,
official stats are hard to come by for obvious reasons but colleagues I have
spoken to from other offices indicate 20%+ particularly for the lower admin
grades.

Mike
 
Mike said:
Probably not, but the the do-gooder will be ground out of them by
unremmitting boredom of processing, frustration (system/IT/management
/gov.), being moaned at by customers about circumstances well beyond your
control and the ingratitude/downright nastiness of a few customers.
Most people apply for thejob because they see it as a long term career, some
because they want to help but many apply because its fills the time in
before they find something better. The turnover of staff is very high but
that first year is the killer, over the last 18 mths-2 years I would
estimate in my office about 1/3 new recruits have left before the end of
their first year. This is prob a little over the average but not much,
official stats are hard to come by for obvious reasons but colleagues I have
spoken to from other offices indicate 20%+ particularly for the lower admin
grades.
Indeed, Jobcentre staff are badly trained and put up with a lot of crap, I'd
never work on the frontline (labour market side). They employ a lot of
casuals who they get rid of just when they are getting decent at the Job. To
work in the Jobcentre I'd say it does help if you want to help people (and I
have met a few, normally obese, lone parent advisors who do like to help)
but at the end of the day its just a job and hardly anyone gives a shit. The
moral in the Dept is crap, loads of people want to leave. As Mike says most
people see it as a stepping stone for something else. Some staff do sod all
but there are some good ones who deserve better. The pay is crap of course
as well and this is a major major thing. When I have had people throw things
off my head and threaten me in all sorts of ways I had to question my
sanity.
 
A

anthonyberet

Mike said:
Probably not, but the the do-gooder will be ground out of them by
unremmitting boredom of processing, frustration (system/IT/management
/gov.), being moaned at by customers about circumstances well beyond
your control and the ingratitude/downright nastiness of a few
customers.
Most people apply for thejob because they see it as a long term
career, some because they want to help but many apply because its
fills the time in before they find something better. The turnover of
staff is very high but that first year is the killer, over the last
18 mths-2 years I would estimate in my office about 1/3 new recruits
have left before the end of their first year. This is prob a little
over the average but not much, official stats are hard to come by for
obvious reasons but colleagues I have spoken to from other offices
indicate 20%+ particularly for the lower admin grades.
I would agree with most of that.
I stuck it for a year, but it was such a relief to get out of there.
However, it wasn't the customers that made me unhappy but the management,
and their habit of handing us extra obstacles in response to suggestions, or
pleas, for improvements.
I had no clue how crap a large organisation could be before that. It was
cetainly an eye opener.
The customers were almost all really interesting though, for various
reasons.
-I worked in one of the most challeged areas of London too..
I still feel I get to help people now though -it wasn't stamped out of me.
I think that takes about 2 years maximum.
 
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M

Mike

However, it wasn't the customers that made me unhappy but the management,
and their habit of handing us extra obstacles in response to suggestions, or
pleas, for improvements.
It feels like Takeshi's Castle at the mo, we're the poor contestants trying
to battle the obstacles whilst management (and the gov are the top of the
tree) put more up all the time. Currently the pension service are going
balls out to meet the 2.4m pension credit claims by april and screw
everything else, wether the claim is right or the customer actually gets the
money is irrelavant, just as long as it's shown as 'live' on the system.

It was even suggested by someone very senior that when customers die they're
claim should not be closed down (payments stopped though), the idea was shot
down but if they get desperate I think it may be suggested again. As in my
small office alone anything up to 50 deaths are reported each day it would
add 30-40,000 nationally to the live load (no pun intended) by 1/4/04.

The ACT system is a mess largely as there are some ommissions in the
guidance and the details being taken over the phone are not formatted
correctly. A missed / or - in the roll/reference no. for old style building
society accounts and the payment simply wont get there.

Mike
 

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