USA Inherited account(s) question for taxes


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Hi Everyone -I was wondering if anyone could give me advice on inherited accounts (IRA and non-retirement). My father recently passed away and I was the primary (and only) beneficiary to two financial accounts. It did not go to probate as I was set up as owner beforehand. a inherited IRA account and a inherited money market account (non retirement). Both of these accounts were and are still 100% allocated to a vanguard money market treasury fund (VUSXX). They are now fully in my name.

For the non-retirement account, I understand interest or dividends paid after the account has been in my name are taxable income. Is the lump sum I received taxable if I withdraw/sell some? So for example, if I want to take out 20k to buy a car or reinvest in different funds/positions, Is that 20k taxed as income once it leaves this money market account? Or is this account more like a savings account where I can put money in and take out without penalty? Under my vanguard account it now shows under my name and is labeled as a "brokerage account" the fund is called VUSXX.


For the traditional IRA. I was told I have 10 years to liquidate it. I looked up the IRS exclusions, but I don't think I meet any of them. Any withdrawal or dividend/interests returns from this account is subject to income tax as I understand. Is there any tax saving measure I can do such as reinvesting or moving it into a different type of account? or anything else I am not thinking of to minimize the tax liability? Could I role it over into my own 401k and not have to liquidate it in 10 years? if I did that, would I still have to pay income tax on the whole amount since I moved/rolled it?

Thanks everyone!
 
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