Non traditional pathway

USA Discussion in 'Career and Jobs' started by WhiteTightKnight, Jun 16, 2018.

  1. WhiteTightKnight

    WhiteTightKnight

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    Hey there cool cats. I am a 19 year old first year computer science student but I want to be a chartered accountant. If I go the traditional pathway in Ireland(my home nation) then I will finish college when I'm 22 and finish my chartered accountancy qualification when I am 25.5. Is this considered old for a beginning chartered accountant and will this affect me in my career when I try to get my first job after being qualified? I want to work in America. If I do my training programme in one of the big 4(probably pwc because I know a lot of people who work there or have worked there) then how easy is it to transfer to America through them? Are the big four generally open to employees moving to other countries for work? Also what is the salary progression like for various different roles in America if I move into industry after doing my chartered training programme in pwc?
     
    WhiteTightKnight, Jun 16, 2018
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  2. WhiteTightKnight

    Becky Administrator

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    Welcome to the forum :) I'm not sure I follow, you want to do your ACA qualification then get a job? If you join a firm like PWC as a graduate you can do your qualification with them. 22 would not be considered old for a graduate position, most people will be around that age.

    In terms of working abroad, most big firms want you to be working with them for 2 years before putting you on secondment abroad, but if you're looking to move then that's different. I guess there's nothing to stop you, but there may be a minimum period you have to be employed by them or else you need to pay back some tuition costs (if you join as a graduate).

    Is there are reason you don't want to make use of your computer science degree? Developers are in huge demand at the moment, and the salaries can be lucrative. There is far more competition in accountancy.
     
    Becky, Jun 18, 2018
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  3. WhiteTightKnight

    WhiteTightKnight

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    I am doing an internship in computer science now and I don't think it's something I want to do for the rest of my life. I like the problem solving aspects but I also like accountancy. Also it seems to me that over the course of a career I can make more as a chartered accountant than as a developer. You said that there is a lot of competition but if I qualify while working at pwc for 3.5 years and then move into industry when I'm 25 is it possible to make 6 figures right away? What are the main paths people take once they are qualified? I'd like to move somewhere other than Ireland for work since I'm getting sick of the rain and the high taxes here make it quite unappealing for full time work. I understand that it is necessary to enjoy work as well but I honestly don't enjoy working in computer science as much as accountancy. Thanks
     
    WhiteTightKnight, Jun 18, 2018
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  4. WhiteTightKnight

    Becky Administrator

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    Fair enough, it's best to stick with something you enjoy :)

    Possible; yes. Likely; no.

    From my experience most people tend to stay where they are after qualifying, some move to different firms after a while, it tends to be a small portion who move in to industry.

    If you're looking to work abroad I'd say your best bet would be to work with a big company (like PWC), do a secondment (which is great because it keeps your options open), and if you like it there then try to secure a full time position.
     
    Becky, Jun 19, 2018
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